ANTIQUE CHICHESTER NOTES ON CATHEDRALS W.H. Fairbairns S.P.C.K. London The Campfield Press St. Albans BOOKLET – British & Far East Traders Lifestyle & Shopping Blog
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ANTIQUE

CHICHESTER

NOTES ON CATHEDRALS

W.H. Fairbairns

S.P.C.K. London

The Campfield Press

St. Albans

BOOKLET

 
DETAILS:
 
CHICHESTER has been a cathedral city since 1075, 
the see having been originally placed at Selsea. 
Christianity made no progress among the South Saxons
for nearly a hundred years
after the landing of Augustine in Kent;
the Sussex shores were the home of pirates,
who about the year 650 nearly captured the famous
Wilfred of Northumbria
returning from France after his consecration
as Archbishop of York.
‘At a later period of his life
Wilfred nobly revenged himself
on this inhospitable people by labouring,
and with success, 
in their conversion to Christianity. 
About the year 680 Wilfred, 
after his flight from Northumbria
joined a small body of Christians under
a Scot named Dicul, at Bosham;
by working among the people for their material good
he obtained their confidence and secured their conversion. 
The peninsula of Selsea- the¬†‘Seals’ Island
was granted to him by King Aedilwich,
and there a monastery was built,
and the see established, 
Wilfred himself becoming the first bishop. 
And here Oswald,
the sainted king of Nothumbria,
was specially reverenced. 
Wilfred became counsellor to Caedwalla, 
the conqueror of his first patron Aedilwich;
‘he laboured abundantly’
in the conversion of the people of the Isle of Wight
and the South, 
and after the death of Ecgfried of Northumbria
returned to the Yorkshire diocese. 
The last Saxon bishop, Aethelric, 
was deprived, and for some unknown reason
imprisoned at Marlborough,
Stigand a chaplain of the Conqueror succeeding. 
 
Some distinguished names are on the roll
of the Bishops of Chichester, 
among them Richard Poore, 
afterwards the builder of Salisbury Cathedral,
Reginald Pecock, the most remarkable churchman of his time,
and the famous Lancelot Andrewes;
but perhaps the most interesting name
is that of Richard de la Wych, 
the sainted Bishop of Chichester, 
and the patron of the city. 
He was an Oxford man, 
of which University he subsequently became Chancellor.
He was a splendid worker in his diocese,
a strenous supporter of Becket,
preached the Crusade, 
and lived so exemplary a life
that he was canonized by Pope Urban V.
The translation of¬†St. Richard’s¬†relics
took place in 1276 in the presence
of King Edward I and his court. 
 
The architectural study of the Cathedral
is of considerable value, 
embracing as it does examples of all the great building periods, 
some of them exceptional merit.
Fire and the Puritans wrought some damage.
When the city was taken in 1642
the Parliamentary army under Sir William Waller
occupied the Cathedral, 
and not very gently. 
John Evelyn¬†in 1683 visited this¬†‘fair cathedral’.
  
Chichester has a distinction
that raises it far above all other English cathedral cities. 
It was probably the home of the Claudia 
of¬†St. Paul’s¬†Epistle to Timothy,
who almost certainly was a British Princess.
Claudia’s father was faithful to the cause of Rome
and ruled the province;
his daughter was married to the patrician Pudens. 
 

FEATURES TO BE NOTICED

 
 Five aisles in nave- 
the only other English cathedral
having this peculiarity is Manchester.
Striking effects of light and shade result. 
View from the north-west corner of north aisle
should not be missed.
South window of south transept
one of the best examples of Decorated work in England. 
Purbeck shafts farther detached from piers
than any other example.
Sculptured slabs in south choir aisle-
said to have been removed from Selsea.
The chapel of south choir aisle
claims to have the first modern memorial window,
but the glass has been replaced. 
Modern stained glass, 
some of it bad, 
in unusual quantity. 
Portraits of the Bishops of Selsea and Chichester
from the beginning,
and the Monarchs of England-
note Caedwalla in likeness of Henry VII,
the patron of Bishop Sherborne.
Ancient presidential chair in Consistory Court
The Campanile is the only existing example
of detached tower adjoining a cathedral;
the one at Salisbury was destroyed by yatt.
In the library, 
Cranmer’s copy of¬†Archbishop Hermann’s¬†Service Book,¬†
and some old and interesting MSS. 
 

BUILDING DATES

 
1088. Cathedral begun by Bishop Ralph.
1108. Consecration of the earliest portion.
1114. Fire partly destroys the building.
1184. Cathedral finished and consecrated.
1186. Fire again causes considerable damage.
1199. Restoration- Bishop Seffrid II. Clerestory of nave.
1223-44. Outeraisles, or chapels of nave. 1250. c. Retro-choir.
1288-1305. Lady-chapel lengthened – Bishop Gilbert de St. Leotard
1305-36. Campanile РBishop Langton. 
South window of south transept.
Choir stalls.
1350 c. Central tower.
1400 c. Spire; upper part rebuilt by Wren, 
who fixed an ingenious pendulum to counteract the force of the wind.
Both spire and tower fell in 1861. 
1460.c. The Arundel rood- screen; removed 1859.
1507- 36 Decoration of vaulting by the Bernardis;
destroyed in nineteenth century.
1843- 56. Repairs and estoration. 
1859. Nave adapted for public worship.
1860. Restoration under Mr. W. Slater.
1861. Sir Gilbert Scott appointed architect.
1866. Tower and spire rebuilt. 
1901. N.W. tower rebuilt. 
 
There are six restored chapels: 
the Lady Chapel;
Chapel of St. George, 
a Memorial of the Royal Sussex Regiment, 
containing on unique panels the names
of those who fell in the Great War;
the Chapels of St. Mary Magdalene, 
St. Clement,
St. Edmund of Pontigny,
with St. Thomas Becket, 
and St. Catherine
 
 
 

DIMENSIONS

 
Internal length 393 feet.
Width of nave 91 feet Рsurpassed in England only by York. 
Length of choir 115 feet, breadth 59 feet.
Height of spire 277 feet. 
     
 

MONUMENTS

 
In addition to those mentioned under ‘Historical Notes’,
there are monuments or tombs of Maud, Countess of Arundel (1270);
Richard Fitz-Alan, fourteenth Earl of Arundel,
beheaded 1397, and his Countess –
restored in 1843 by Richardson ‘the repairer’
of the effigies in the Temple church; 
William Bradbridge (1592) thrice mayor;
William Chillingworth (1643)
the champion of Protestantism;
Dean Hayley (1736);
Agnes Cromwell was granddaughter of the Lady Frankland
commemorated in¬†Oliver Wendel Holmes’s¬†poem
‘Agnes’ (she is buried in St Pancras Churchyard in Chichester);
several monuments by Flaxman, 
including that of William Collins the poet;
William Huskisson, M.P. for Chichester;
Dean Hook (1875) ;
Bishop Jones (Suffragan of Lewes);
former choristers who fell in the Great War; Dean Burgon. 
 
One of the windows was given by Cardinal Manning,
when he was Archdeacon of Chichester, 
in memory of his wife. 
On the iron grilles and gates are names of
Bishop Sherborne, 
Dean Chandler,
and Dr. Codrington, of Melanesian fame. 
The font was erected by Bishop Durnford
in memory of his wife.  
 
 

HISTORICAL NOTES

 
A.D
 
43- 410. ROMAN OCCUPATION OF BRITAIN.
 
449. ENGLISH LAND IN BRITAIN.
 
477. Kingdom of South Saxons established.
 
597. Arrival of Augustine in Kent.
 
680. Monastery established at Selsea by Wilfred. 
 
1070. Stigand: 
first Norman bishop;
chaplain of the Conqueror.
 
1075. The place of the see removed to Chichester. 
 
1091. Ralph de Luffa:
builder of the greater part of the existing Cathedral;
withstood William Rufus in the interest of Archbishop Anselm. 
 
1125. Seffrid I: Abbott of Glastonbury;
brother of Ralph, Archbishop of Canterbury. 
    
1148.¬†Hilary: the bishop of¬†Tennyson’s Becket.¬†
    
1180. Seffrid II: assisted at the coronation of King John. 
    
1215. Richard Poore: 
translated to Salisbury in 1217
where he began the existing cathedral. 
    
1224. Ralph Neville:
Chancellor of England;
great builder at his cathedral. 
    
1245. Richard de la Wych:
St. Richard of Chichester; 
born at Droitwich (whence his name);
educated at Oxford, Paris, and Bologna;
Chancellor at Oxford University;
after a life of no ordinary excellence,
he died in 1253, 
was canonized in 1261;
his relics were translated in 1276
to the shrine in which they remained until the Reformation. 
   
1262. Stephen de Berkstead:
on the side of Simon de Montfort. 
   
1288. Gilbert de St. Leofard:
builder of the Lady-chapel;
Matthew of Westminster says of him
‘ A father of orphans and consoler of Widows,¬†
a pious and humble visitor
at the beds and in the cottages of the poor,
a friend of the needy far more than that of the rich’.¬†
 
1305. John de Langton:
Chancellor of England;
he excommunicated Earl Warrene of Lewes Castle
who tried to seize him but was himself
caught and imprisoned in the Bishop’s dungeon.¬†
 
1337. Robert Stratford:
brother of Abp. Stratford;
Chancellor of England;
Chancellor of Oxford University, 
where he distinguished himself by reconciling
the Southern and Northern students. 
 
 1369. William Rede:
founder of the library of Merton College;
builder of Amberley Castle. 
 
 1385. Thomas Rushook:
confessor of Richard II;
subsequently Bishop of Triburn, now Kilmore. 
 
1389. Richard Mitford:
to Salisbury 1395. 
 
1395. Robert Waldby:
Archbishop of Dublin;
to York 1396. 
 
 1420. John Kemp:
from Rochester;
translated successively to London, York, and Canterbury. 
 
 1438. Richard Praty:
Chancellor of Oxford University. 
 
1445. Adam Moleyns:
commissioner for delivering Maine and Anjou to Rene
on the marriage of his daughter to Henry VI;
this action leading to the ultimate loss
of the French possessions aroused great indignation, 
and the bishop was murdered
by sailors at Portsmouth in 1449. 
 
1450. Reginald Pecock:
educated at Oriel College, Oxford;
famous for learning;
appointed to Whittington College, London
by Humphrey Duke of Gloucester;
here he studied the tenets of the Lollards,
and in 1449 published a book
The Repressor of overmuch blaming of the Clergy
which is described by Hallam as
‘the earliest piece of good philosophical discussion
of which our English prose literature can boast’;
accused in 1456 of heresy he recanted, 
was ultimately imprisoned and died
in Thorney Abbey. 
 
1459. John Arundel: 
builder of the rood- screen. 
 
 1478. Edward Storey:
builder of the market-cross .
 
1503. Richard Fitz James:
to London 1506. 
 
1508. Robert Sherburne:
educated at Winchester school, 
and New College, Oxford;
a great scholar;
patronized by Henry VII;
held the see until he was nearly ninety-six, 
when he resigned. 
 
1543. George Day:
a papist, deprived by Edward VI;
imprisoned in the Tower;
restored by Queen Mary. 
 
  1557. John Christopherson:
Master of Trinity College;
appointed by Queen Mary;
an active persecutor;
deprived by Queen Elizabeth. 
 
 1559. William Barlow:
first Reforming Bishop of Chichester;
his five daughters each married a bishop. 
 
1584. Thomas Bickley:
consecrated in his eightieth year;
Fellow of Magdalene College, Oxford;
Warden of Merton College. 
 
1605. Lancelot Andrewes:
to Ely 1609;
Winchester 1619. 
 
 1619. George Carleton:
a representative of the English Church at the Synod of Dort.
 
1628. Richard Montague:
active member of the Romanizing party;
his Appello Caesarem
created considerable stir,
and was referred to a Committee of Religion 
(the first of its kind) under Pym. 
 
1638. Brian Duppa:
Salisbury 1641:
Winchester 1660. 
 
1641. Henry King:
son of John King, Bishop of London;
driven from his see during the Commonwealth;
Pepys says, ‘he presented before the King,
and made a great flattering sermon,
which I did not like that the Clergy
should meddle with matters of State’;
friend of Isaak Walton. 
 
 1669. Peter Gunning:
to Ely 1675.
 
1675. Ralph Brideoake:
chaplain to Speaker Lenthall;
a ‘trier’ promoted at the Restoration.¬†
 
1678. Guy Carleton:
appointed in his 82nd year. 
 
 1685. John Lake:
one of the Seven Bishops.
 
1715. Thomas Sherlock: 
dean. 
 
1731. Francis Hare:
Duke of Marlborough’s chaplain.¬†
 
1842. Ashurst Turner Gilbert. 
 
1870. Richard Durnford. 
 
1895. Ernest Roland Wilberforce. 
 
1908. Charles John Ridgeway. 
 
1919. Winfrid Oldfield Burrows. 
 
1929. George Kennedy Allen Bell. 
 
 

Available at:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/294031317563

 

  
 
 
 
THE CATHEDRAL FROM THE NORTH- EAST

THE TOWN CROSS
THE TOWN CROSS

THE NAVE
TOMB OF BISHOP STRATFORD

THE REREDOS
THE PRESBYTERY OR RETRO- CHOIR

THE LADY CHAPEL
THE CLOISTER

OUR LORD WITH MARTHA AND MARY

    


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