BBC PROMS: THE WORLD’S GREATEST CLASSICAL MUSIC FESTIVAL- A NIGHT WITH BEETHOVEN AT ROYAL ALBERT HALL LONDON UNITED KINGDOM | British & Far East Traders Lifestyle & Shopping Blog
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BBC PROMS

    

To learn more about the BBC PROMS, please visit the official website at : https://www.bbc.co.uk/proms

 

  

The Proms, or The BBC Proms, more formally known as The Henry Wood Promenade Concerts,[1][2][3] is an eight-week summer season of daily orchestral classical music concerts and other events held annually, predominantly in the Royal Albert Hall in central London. The Proms were founded in 1895, and are now organised and broadcast by the BBC. Each season consists of concerts in the Royal Albert Hall, chamber music concerts at Cadogan Hall, additional Proms in the Park events across the UK on the Last Night of the Proms, and associated educational and children’s events. The season is a significant event in British culture and in classical music. Czech conductor Jiří Bělohlávek described the Proms as “the world’s largest and most democratic musical festival”.[4]

 

 

Prom is short for promenade concert, a term which originally referred to outdoor concerts in London’s pleasure gardens, where the audience was free to stroll around while the orchestra was playing. In the context of the BBC Proms, promming refers to the use of the standing areas inside the hall (the Arena and Gallery) for which ticket prices are much lower than for the seating. Proms concert-goers, particularly those who stand, are sometimes referred to as “Prommers” or “Promenaders”.

 

 

 

History

 
 

   

Origins and Sir Henry Wood

    

Promenade concerts had existed in London’s pleasure gardens since the mid 18th century, and indoor proms became a feature of 19th century musical life in London from 1838, notably under the direction of Louis Antoine Jullien and Sir Arthur Sullivan.[5] The annual series of Proms continuing today had their roots in that movement. They were inaugurated on 10 August 1895 in the Queen’s Hall in Langham Place by the impresario Robert Newman, who was fully experienced in running similar concerts at His Majesty’s Theatre.[6] Newman wished to generate a wider audience for concert hall music by offering low ticket prices and an informal atmosphere, where eating, drinking and smoking were permitted to the promenaders. He stated his aim to Henry Wood in 1894[7] as follows:

   

I am going to run nightly concerts and train the public by easy stages. Popular at first, gradually raising the standard until I have created a public for classical and modern music.[8]

   

George Cathcart, an otolaryngologist, gave financial backing to Newman for the series (called “Mr Robert Newman’s Promenade Concerts”) on condition that Henry Wood be employed as the sole conductor.[9][10] Wood, aged 26, seized this opportunity and built the “Queen’s Hall Orchestra” as the ensemble specially devoted to performing the promenade concerts.[11] Cathcart also stipulated (contrary to Newman’s preference) the adoption of French or Open Diapason concert pitch, necessitating the acquisition of an entirely new set of wind instruments for the orchestra, and the re-tuning of the Queen’s Hall organ. This coincided with the adoption of this lower pitch by other leading orchestras and concert series.[12] Although the concerts gained a popular following and reputation, Newman went bankrupt in 1902, and the banker Edgar Speyer took over the expense of funding them. Wood received a knighthood in 1911. In 1914 anti-German feeling led Speyer to surrender his role, and music publishers Chappell & Co. took control of the concerts.[13]

 

 

      

Although Newman remained involved in artistic planning, it was Wood’s name which became most closely associated with the Proms.[14] As conductor from the first concert (which opened with Wagner’s Rienzi overture) in 1895, Sir Henry was largely responsible for building the repertoire heard as the series continued from year to year. While including many popular and less demanding works, in the first season there were substantial nights devoted to Beethoven or Schubert, and a programme of new works was given in the final week. Distinguished singers including Sims Reeves and Signor Foli appeared. In the first two decades Wood firmly established the policy of introducing works by contemporary composers (both British and international) and of bringing fresh life to unperformed or under-performed works.[15] A bronze bust of Sir Henry Wood recovered from the ruins of the bombed-out Queen’s Hall in 1941, and now belonging to the Royal Academy of Music,[16] is still placed in front of the organ for the whole Promenade season. Though the concerts are now called the BBC Proms, and are headlined with the BBC logo, the tickets are subtitled “BBC Music presents the Henry Wood Promenade Concerts”.

 

   

   

In 1927, following Newman’s sudden death in the previous year, the BBC – later based at Broadcasting House next to the hall – took over the running of the concerts.[17] This arose because William Boosey, then managing director of Chappell & Co. (the Prom. proprietors), detested broadcasting and saw the BBC’s far-reaching demands and intentions in the control of musical presentation as a danger to the future of public concerts altogether. He decided to disband the New Queen’s Hall Orchestra, which played for the last time at a Symphony concert on 19 March 1927. He found it more expedient to let the Queen’s Hall to the broadcasting powers, rather than to continue the Promenade concerts and other big series independently in an unequal competition with what was effectively the Government itself. So the Proms. were saved, but under a different kind of authority. The personnel of the New Queen’s Hall Orchestra effectively continued until 1930 as “Sir Henry J. Wood and his Symphony Orchestra”.[18] When the BBC Symphony Orchestra (BBC SO) was formed in 1930, it became the main orchestra for the concerts. At this time the season consisted of nights dedicated to particular composers; Mondays were Wagner, Fridays were Beethoven, with other major composers being featured on other days. There were no Sunday performances.

 

 

      

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. 

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Proms

 

  

 

 

PARK GRAND LONDON HYDE PARK

OFFICIAL WEBSITE: https://www.parkgrandhydepark.co.uk/

  
 
 
 
 

 

THE ROYAL ALBERT HALL

   

The Royal Albert Hall is a concert hall on the northern edge of South KensingtonLondon. One of the United Kingdom’s most treasured and distinctive buildings, it is held in trust for the nation and managed by a registered charity (which receives no government funding).[2] It can seat 5,272.[1]

 

    

  

Since the hall’s opening by Queen Victoria in 1871, the world’s leading artists from many performance genres have appeared on its stage. It is the venue for some of the most notable events in British culture, in particular the Proms concerts, which have been held there every summer since 1941. It is host to more than 390 shows in the main auditorium annually, including classical, rock and pop concerts, ballet, opera, film screenings with live orchestral accompaniment, sports, awards ceremonies, school and community events, and charity performances and banquets. A further 400 events are held each year in the non-auditorium spaces.

 

 

 

The hall was originally supposed to have been called the Central Hall of Arts and Sciences, but the name was changed to the Royal Albert Hall of Arts and Sciences by Queen Victoria upon laying the Hall’s foundation stone in 1867, in memory of her husband, Prince Albert, who had died six years earlier. It forms the practical part of a memorial to the Prince Consort; the decorative part is the Albert Memorial directly to the north in Kensington Gardens, now separated from the Hall by Kensington Gore.

 

 

 

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Albert_Hall

 

 

   

KENSINGTON GARDENS

     

 

Chillin out in Kensington Gardens while waiting for the BBC Proms performance in Royal Albert Hall. 

 

 THE ALBERT MEMORIAL

   

The Albert Memorial, directly north of the Royal Albert Hall in Kensington GardensLondon, was commissioned by Queen Victoria in memory of her beloved husband Prince Albert, who died in 1861. Designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott in the Gothic Revival style, it takes the form of an ornate canopy or pavilion 176 feet (54 m) tall, in the style of a Gothic ciborium over the high altar of a church,[1] sheltering a statue of the prince facing south. It took over ten years to complete, the £120,000 cost (the equivalent of about £10,000,000 in 2010) met by public subscription.

 

 

 

The memorial was opened in July 1872 by Queen Victoria, with the statue of Albert ceremonially “seated” in 1876.[2] It has been Grade I listed since 1970.[3]

 

 

 

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. 

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Memorial

 

 

OUTSIDE  THE ROYAL ALBERT HALL

    

Prom goers waiting outside Royal Albert Hall. Good thing the weather is pleasant in London that day. 

 

   

People queuing for tickets and for security.

    

   

THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF MUSIC

   

The Royal College of Music is a conservatoire established by royal charter in 1882, located in South Kensington, London, UK. It offers training from the undergraduate to the doctoral level in all aspects of Western Music including performance, composition, conducting, music theory and history. The RCM also undertakes research, with particular strengths in performance practice and performance science. The college was named the top institution for Performing Arts in both the United Kingdom and Europe in the 2018 QS World University Rankings.[citation needed] It was also ranked second across all Performing Arts institutions worldwide. The college is one of the four conservatories of the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music and a member of Conservatoires UK. Its buildings are directly opposite the Royal Albert Hall on Prince Consort Road, next to Imperial College and among the museums and cultural centres of Albertopolis.

 

 

 

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. 

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_College_of_Music

 

 

 

 

If you fancy walking around London a bit more, please head over to our blog post: 

    

 

ENJOYING A BEAUTIFUL DAY’S WALK AROUND CENTRAL LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

 

 

  

INSIDE THE ROYAL ALBERT HALL

 
 
 

KENSINGTON AFTER THE PROM

 
 

While having a glass of White Wine in the prom, have slowly drifted off to sleep under the influence of alcohol and classical music lol. 

 

   

  

To be honest, classical music is NOT YET for us. SMOOTH JAZZ bring it on! 

 

 

 

Now had to retrace the steps back to the hotel. Only a few blocks but if you’re dopey it feels like miles away. 

 

 

 

 Goodnight London…

Goodnight World….

 

 

 

 

Thank You...

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