CHARMING ENGLISH CHURCHES AND ENGLISH VILLAGES AT THE FOOTHILLS OF THE SOUTHDOWNS, EAST SUSSEX & WEST SUSSEX, ENGLAND | British & Far East Traders Lifestyle & Shopping Blog
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CHARMING ENGLISH CHURCHES

AND ENGLISH VILLAGES

AT THE FOOTHILLS

OF THE SOUTHDOWNS,

EAST SUSSEX & WEST SUSSEX, 

ENGLAND

 
 

Ditchling is a village and civil parish 

in the Lewes District of East Sussex, England.

The village is contained within the boundaries

of the South Downs National Park

the order confirming the establishment of the park

was signed in Ditchling.[3]

An artistic community founded by the artist Eric Gill

during the early 20th century, 

and known as The Guild of St Joseph and St Dominic[4] 

survived until 1989.

Location

The village lies at the foot of the South Downs

 in East Sussex, 

but very close to the border with West Sussex

The settlement stands around a crossroads 

with Brighton to the south, 

Burgess Hill and Haywards Heath to the north, 

Keymer and Hassocks to the west, 

and Lewes to the east, 

and is built on a slight spur of land between

the Downs to the south and Lodge Hill to the north. 

Ditchling Beacon, one of the highest points on the South Downs,

overlooks the village.

Ditchling Common, north of the village, 

is the source of the eastern River Adur 

which meets with the western River Adur near Henfield

and flows on to the English Channel at Shoreham-by-Sea.[5]

      

History

It is unknown exactly when the people of Dicul settled in the village,

but Ditchling is first recorded in 765

as Dicelinga in a grant by King Alduuf

of land bordering that of Ditchling.[citation needed] 

Later it is recorded that the Manor

and its lands were held by King Alfred the Great (871–899).

Alfred left it in his will to a kinsmen named Osferth,

and it reverted to the Crown under Edward the Confessor.

After the Norman conquest,

the land was held by William de Warenne.

The Domesday book mentions a church and a mill in Ditchling

and the population was approx 150 households.

In 1095 there is mention of a manor house,

what is now Wings Place.

The land passed through several hands until in 1435

it was owned by the Marquess of Abergavenny

who held it until the 20th century,

when it was sold to developers

who failed to get planning permission to build.

 

In the 18th and 19th centuries

the Old Meeting House in Ditchling

was an important centre for Baptists from the wider area,

whose records and memorandum books

allow a unique insight into a small

rural religious community of the period.

These records (in the East Sussex Record Office)

bear witness to often fractious and heated debates

about morality and religion.

    

In the 1960s, Ditchling’s tithe barn was dismantled

and moved to Loughton,

where it now forms the Corbett Theatre

on the University of Essex campus there.

    

In January 2007,

Ditchling featured in a five piece BBC Documentary entitled

Storyville: A Very English Village

This was filmed, produced and directed by a Ditchling resident,

but the series itself came under criticism from local residents.[citation needed]

    

There are two public houses,

The Bull and The White Horse;

two cafes, The Nutmeg Tree and The Green Welly;

a post office, florist, delicatessen and other shops.

Ditchling has community groups and societies,

including the Ditchling Film Society and the Ditchling Singers.[citation needed]

   

In the 2017 novel Rabbitman,

by Michael Paraskos,

the village was the setting for a Catholic Worker anarchist

commune in an imagined post-Brexit dystopia.

   

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ditchling

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License;

additional terms may apply. 

 

 

 

Ditchling Village Traditional Houses
The White Horse Free House

IF LIFE IS A PUZZLE, TALK TO THE CREATOR

St. Margaret’s Church, Ditchling.

A Frozen POND

    

St Cosmas and St Damian Church, 

Keymer

    

 

St Cosmas and St Damian Church is an Anglican church

in the village of Keymer

in the Mid Sussex district of West SussexEngland.

Rebuilt in 1866 in a style similar to the Saxon building it replaced,

it is the parish church of Keymer 

and now lies within a combined parish 

serving three villages in Mid Sussex.

The church bears a very rare dedication

to the twin Saints Cosmas and Damian,

Christian martyrs of the 4th century.

It is a grade II listed building.

History

 

 

The medieval manor of Keymer

was recorded in the Domesday Book in 1086

as being held by William de Watevile for William de Warenne,[1] 

who built the nearby Lewes Castle.

A church existed on the present site at that time;

it was associated with Lewes Priory,

which had been given it by a successor of de Watevile in 1093.[1]

 

The present building incorporates

some 12th-century structural elements:

the chancel walls[1] and apse[2] date from that time.

Until the rebuilding in 1866, 

there had been little change to the structure since the 14th century.[3] 

The reconstruction was undertaken by Brighton-based architect Edmund Scott,[2][3] 

who was responsible for several churches in his home town;

he matched the church’s largely 14th-century style

rather than redesigning the building significantly.[3]

Six bells were added at various times:

one in 1791, another in 1866 and a peal of four in 1911.[1]

  

The church has a large graveyard 

with several war graves and a war memorial.[4]

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

identifies five soldiers—

three from the First World War

and two from the Second World War

who are buried there.[5]

There is no longer enough space for burials

to take place in the original churchyard,

so a new burial ground has been established

in a field opposite the church.

Mid Sussex District Council acquired the land

on behalf of the Parish of Keymer and Clayton,

and transferred ownership to Hassocks Parish Council.

The latter now manages the area,

which is called the Hassocks Burial Ground

and Garden of Remembrance.[6][7]

The patron of the church,

and holder of the advowson,

is Brasenose CollegeOxford.[1][3]

 

Dedication

 

The dedication of the church, 

to the twin Saints Cosmas and Damian

is extremely rare in the Church of England.

Only three other extant churches in England bear their names:[2] 

at Challock in Kent;[8] 

Blean, two miles to the north of Canterbury, Kent;

and Sherrington in Wiltshire.[9] 

A redundant church with the same name exists near Leominster in Herefordshire.[10] 

The saints are believed to have been twin brothers

who worked as doctors in the Roman province of Syria.

They were well-educated in science and medicine,

and treated people without expecting any payment.

They were known to have been put to death in 303

during the Diocletianic Persecution.[11]

    

Architecture

    

 

The church walls are built of flint

in an irregular style reminiscent of crazy paving.

There is a small tower and steeple topped with a small,

two-stage spire at the southwest corner.[2]

The plan consists of a chancel with Norman-era

apse, nave, aisles, and a porch at the south end.[1]

The south aisle was built in the 1866 reconstruction,

but its counterpart on the north side was added in 1890.[2] 

The ancient stone dressings in the east window

were preserved during the rebuilding.The remains of what may be an original piscina,

which lacks its basin, is in the apse.[1]

   

SOURCE:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Cosmas_and_St_Damian_Church,_Keymer

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License

additional terms may apply. 

 

 

Churchyard of St. Cosmas and St. Damian Church, Keymer.

St. Cosmas & St. Damian Church, Keymer.

 

 

ADASTRA PARK MEMORIAL GARDENS

( REMEMBRANCE GARDENS )

HASSOCKS

 

Brief Description

The memorial gardens are one component of Adastra Park,

which also has facilities for cricket, croquet, bowling,

tennis and a community pavilion.

   

History

E.D. Stafford donated the park

to the parish council in memory of his son

who was killed in World War 1.

   

 

Source: https://www.parksandgardens.org/places/adastra-park-memorial-gardens

 

 

 

 

Adastra Park Memorial Gardens / Adastra Garden of Remembrance

Hassocks, with a view of the Famous Hills of SouthDowns National Park in the distance. SouthDowns is popular destination among tourists, hikers, and adventurers alike.
 

 

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